After Dinner Gardening for Kids


If you’ve never thought about how you might
get kids involved in gardening, think about a project called after dinner gardening. This a great wintertime project because of the fact that many of the things we’re
going to talk about here are available in your own grocery store. You’re giving the kids fruit; you tell them to eat their fruit. And inside the fruit of the many
of the fruits that we have, especially the tropical fruit, are seeds. So instead of taking those seeds and
throwing them in the compost or in the trash, think about what kind of plant could I get if I plant those seeds. And what’s really interesting is that
many of the tropical fruit that are available in stores now are extremely
easy to grow from the seed that you harvest from the food that you eat. A couple examples are laid out in front of me over here of fruit that is readily available, and the seeds are very easy to germinate. This one on the end over here is kiwi. That’s that brown, little fuzzy lemon-like
fruit that you oftentimes get. Cut it inside and it’s bright green, and these tiny littled black specs are the
seeds. You can take those seeds out of the fruit, dry them off, and you basically sow them in any type
of a planting media that you like to grow. The little trick about getting kiwi to
germinate is you put it in the refrigerator for about two weeks. It
likes a cold period. Once you do that, the germination is rapid and it produces these neat little
plants with fuzzy leaves. This will actually become kind of a vine. So this is a kiwi. These
next three right here are citrus. We’ve got orange, lime and lemon. Look very similar, but
what you are going to end up with is a tree with shiny green foliage, and it just looks like nice as a houseplant. I
would never expect to see fruit on any of these, but they’re kind of fun to grow.
These are extremely easy to germinate. You take the seeds out of your fruit, maybe you want to clean them up a bit, you
plant them without any treatment, and they will
produce these small little trees. Here we have several trees in one little cell pack.
You can take them, pot them individually, and grow your own, in this case, an orange
tree right here. This is a lime, this is a lemon. Very easy to grow, producing you kind of a
neat little plant. This one right here is a mango. And mango is really kind of nice
because the fact that the seed inside of the fruit looks like a big bean. You take the seed
out of that fruit, you plant it on its side. You don’t plant it flat,
you plant it on end with the growing point kind of on an angle upward. It takes a little while for it to decide to want to grow, but once it starts growing, you have this plant with these really long, shiny green leaves, and the new foliage that comes out is blood
red. It’s a very dark color. So it makes a really nice indoor plant. Again, a tree-like plant that’s fun to look at.
And the last one I have over here is one that, maybe not something kids like to eat a lot because more of a used to spice up certain meals. This is ginger. You can go to store to get a ginger root, a piece of ginger root. You lay it on top of the soil. And again, it might take awhile for this thing to decide it wants to go, but once it does, it will produce this plant that almost looks like palm or bamboo if you will. What’s neat about this plant, it has a really interesting fragrance. The kids and kind of scratch it and smell it. Kind of a neat thing to do. So again, when you’re looking at buying fruit in the store, think about, okay
what can I also get from it that might be interesting, especially with the kids. It’s the seeds. Plant the seeds and you never know what you might get. So
try a bunch of them.

Comments

  1. I recommend having every child in America to grow a TickleMe Plant as it is the only plant that kids can interact with. No other easy to grow plant will close its leaves and lower its branches when tickled. Like your video, growing a TickleMe Plant will excite kids about gardening and nature

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *